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    VA death row inmates

    Post by Guest on Tue May 18, 2010 6:55 pm

    Name

    DOB

    Race

    Venue

    Crime

    Inmate
    Number


    Date
    Entered



    Darick Walker

    7-8-72

    B

    Henrico

    Capital murder

    262155

    10-21-98

    William Burns

    4-30-66

    W

    Shenandoah Co.

    Murder/rape

    282267

    5-12-00

    Justin Michael Wolfe

    3-17-82

    W

    Prince William Co.

    Murder for hire

    309126

    6-26-02

    Jerry Jackson

    7-22-81

    B

    Williamsburg

    Murder, rape, robbery

    319080

    4-3-03

    Teresa Lewis
    [female]

    4-26-69

    W

    Pittsylvania County

    Murder for hire

    321094

    6-4-03

    Leon Winston

    7-2-80

    B

    Lynchburg City

    Capital murder

    329099

    1-29-04

    Anthony Juniper

    11-23-71

    B

    Norfolk

    Capital Murder

    343777

    4-1-05

    Ivan Teleguz

    11-17-78

    W

    Rockingham Co

    Murder for hire

    360579

    7-18-06

    Ricky Javon Gray

    3-9-77

    B

    Richmond

    Capital murder-two counts

    364382

    10-23-06

    Thomas A Porter

    11-1-75

    B

    Norfolk

    Capital Murder-two counts

    374297

    7-16-07
    William Morva c.1982W
    Montgomery Co. Capital Murder-three counts 3874816-24-08
    Alfredo R. Prietoc.1965W
    Fairfax Co.Capital Murder-two counts 392081
    5-23-08
    Joshua W. Andrews
    2-82 B
    Prince William Co.Capital Murder404004
    2009

    There are only 12 men and 1 woman currently on death row in VA. In all likelyhood there will be 11 men in the not too distant future as Derick Walker's execution is impending. There were 349 murders in VA in 2009. Understanding that not all of the 349 were solved and some killers murdered more than one so this does not mean there were 349 murder convictions it is still apparent that the death penalty is not uniformly applied. So.. what makes one murder worse than another? What make the value of one victims life more than another?
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    claudicici

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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by claudicici on Tue May 18, 2010 7:24 pm

    ...it doesn't make any sense at all..I guess a lot has to do with how good the defense lawyer is,so how is that justice?...when was the last time someone was executed in virginia?

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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by Guest on Tue May 18, 2010 7:30 pm

    Two people were executed Nov 09 in VA. In VA the condemed are given the choice between lethal injection and the electric chair. If they do not choose then the state chooses lethal injection for them. One of the men executed in Nov 09 selected the electric chair.
    What some people don't realize is that murder by itself is not a capital offence. The crime must be murder with some special circumstance such as multiple murder, murder of a police officer, or murder for hire.
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    tapu

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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by tapu on Tue May 18, 2010 7:37 pm

    Scott wrote:

    There are only 12 men and 1 woman currently on death row in VA. In all likelyhood there will be 11 men in the not too distant future as Derick Walker's execution is impending. There were 349 murders in VA in 2009. Understanding that not all of the 349 were solved and some killers murdered more than one so this does not mean there were 349 murder convictions it is still apparent that the death penalty is not uniformly applied. So.. what makes one murder worse than another? What make the value of one victims life more than another?

    Not sure I'm following you, Scott. How is it [still] apparent that the dp is not uniformly applied? Not uniformly applied, how?, to ask it another way. You can't mean racially, given this chart. Do you mean there are other capital murder charges that did not result in the dp? And why ask about the relative value of the victims' lives, when no info is given here about that?

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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by Guest on Tue May 18, 2010 7:50 pm

    tapu wrote:
    Scott wrote:

    There are only 12 men and 1 woman currently on death row in VA. In all likelyhood there will be 11 men in the not too distant future as Derick Walker's execution is impending. There were 349 murders in VA in 2009. Understanding that not all of the 349 were solved and some killers murdered more than one so this does not mean there were 349 murder convictions it is still apparent that the death penalty is not uniformly applied. So.. what makes one murder worse than another? What make the value of one victims life more than another?

    Not sure I'm following you, Scott. How is it [still] apparent that the dp is not uniformly applied? Not uniformly applied, how?, to ask it another way. You can't mean racially, given this chart. Do you mean there are other capital murder charges that did not result in the dp? And why ask about the relative value of the victims' lives, when no info is given here about that?
    To clairify "uniformly applied" I meant uniformly applied for the crime of murder. MOST murders are not capital crimes. Many of the murders committed would not qualify as capital. Some that could qualify were not prosecuted that way.
    Concerning the relative value of a victim, someone lost their life in every murder. Why are some murders capital and others are not? Yes I get the police are valuable so that the murder of a police officer is a more serious offence and hence qualifies for a capital charge. But what does that say? Does that say that a police officer's life is worth more than a school teachers, or a doctors, or a grocery store baggers? I don't care for a precedent that assigns value to a human life based on vocation.
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    tapu

    Posts : 228
    Join date : 2010-02-16
    Age : 57
    Location : Sunny Maine

    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by tapu on Tue May 18, 2010 8:14 pm

    Scott wrote:
    tapu wrote:
    Scott wrote:

    There are only 12 men and 1 woman currently on death row in VA. In all likelyhood there will be 11 men in the not too distant future as Derick Walker's execution is impending. There were 349 murders in VA in 2009. Understanding that not all of the 349 were solved and some killers murdered more than one so this does not mean there were 349 murder convictions it is still apparent that the death penalty is not uniformly applied. So.. what makes one murder worse than another? What make the value of one victims life more than another?

    Not sure I'm following you, Scott. How is it [still] apparent that the dp is not uniformly applied? Not uniformly applied, how?, to ask it another way. You can't mean racially, given this chart. Do you mean there are other capital murder charges that did not result in the dp? And why ask about the relative value of the victims' lives, when no info is given here about that?
    To clairify "uniformly applied" I meant uniformly applied for the crime of murder. MOST murders are not capital crimes. Many of the murders committed would not qualify as capital. Some that could qualify were not prosecuted that way.
    Concerning the relative value of a victim, someone lost their life in every murder. Why are some murders capital and others are not? Yes I get the police are valuable so that the murder of a police officer is a more serious offence and hence qualifies for a capital charge. But what does that say? Does that say that a police officer's life is worth more than a school teachers, or a doctors, or a grocery store baggers? I don't care for a precedent that assigns value to a human life based on vocation.

    To your last point: There's probably more than one reason why a state would make killing a police officer a capital crime, when other murders are not so treated. I've never heard the one you state, about their relative value.... However, one justification I have run into is that it's considered to be an additional deterrent to killing, in a situation where killing is so likely to happen. That is, police find themselves facing criminals with guns more than most of us find ourselves in such situations. Therefore, to add some "teeth" to the threat of a murder charge, the law imposes capital murder in that particular case.
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    claudicici

    Posts : 1259
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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by claudicici on Tue May 18, 2010 9:59 pm

    Teresa Lewis Pleads for Her Life: Only Female on Va. Death Row





    Teresa Lewis (AP)


    RICHMOND, Va. (CBS/AP) Teresa Lewis pleaded guilty to murder in 2002 for masterminding a plot that left her husband and stepson dead. Prosecutors said her intent was to collect the insurance money and inherit her husband's estate.
    Shortly after that, Lewis became the first female death row inmate in Virginia in more than 90 years, but her appeals attorneys argued Tuesday that she should be spared the death penalty, because she was too dependent on drugs and other people to mastermind anything.

    James Rocap, Lewis' attorney, argued that her trial attorneys should have presented hundreds of pages of medical and pharmaceutical records showing her increased dependency on prescription drugs following her mother's death, and expert testimony showing that a disorder made her especially dependent on men.

    "She was not a person who could have come up with this," Rocap said.

    Katherine Burnett, a senior assistant attorney general, painted an entirely different picture of Lewis, saying that she bragged to two friends that she was marrying Julian Lewis, Jr. for his money, came up with the idea to kill him and his 25-year-old son, Charles, and offered the two gunmen sex in return for helping her as well as buying the weapons used in the crime.

    The gunmen, Rodney Fuller and Matthew Shallenberger, were sentenced to life in prison.

    Lewis' daughter, Christie Lynn Bean, who was 16 at the time, served five years because she knew about the plan but remained silent.

    David Furrow, Lewis' defense attorney when she pleaded guilty in 2002, said he had expected the judge to sentence Lewis to life in prison.

    But at her sentencing, Circuit Court Judge Charles Strauss said that she appeared cold and emotionless throughout the proceedings, that she seemed to have no other motive besides financial gain, that he saw her as a continuing threat to society, and sentenced her to death.

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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by Guest on Tue May 18, 2010 11:35 pm

    claudicici wrote:Teresa Lewis Pleads for Her Life: Only Female on Va. Death Row





    Teresa Lewis (AP)


    RICHMOND, Va. (CBS/AP) Teresa Lewis pleaded guilty to murder in 2002 for masterminding a plot that left her husband and stepson dead. Prosecutors said her intent was to collect the insurance money and inherit her husband's estate.
    Shortly after that, Lewis became the first female death row inmate in Virginia in more than 90 years, but her appeals attorneys argued Tuesday that she should be spared the death penalty, because she was too dependent on drugs and other people to mastermind anything.

    James Rocap, Lewis' attorney, argued that her trial attorneys should have presented hundreds of pages of medical and pharmaceutical records showing her increased dependency on prescription drugs following her mother's death, and expert testimony showing that a disorder made her especially dependent on men.

    "She was not a person who could have come up with this," Rocap said.

    Katherine Burnett, a senior assistant attorney general, painted an entirely different picture of Lewis, saying that she bragged to two friends that she was marrying Julian Lewis, Jr. for his money, came up with the idea to kill him and his 25-year-old son, Charles, and offered the two gunmen sex in return for helping her as well as buying the weapons used in the crime.

    The gunmen, Rodney Fuller and Matthew Shallenberger, were sentenced to life in prison.

    Lewis' daughter, Christie Lynn Bean, who was 16 at the time, served five years because she knew about the plan but remained silent.

    David Furrow, Lewis' defense attorney when she pleaded guilty in 2002, said he had expected the judge to sentence Lewis to life in prison.

    But at her sentencing, Circuit Court Judge Charles Strauss said that she appeared cold and emotionless throughout the proceedings, that she seemed to have no other motive besides financial gain, that he saw her as a continuing threat to society, and sentenced her to death.
    The gunmen were sentenced to life and the mastermind was sentenced to die. To put it another way who has more responsibility, the person who commits murder or the person who arranges for someone else to do so? They were all participants. This is an example of a non uniform application of the death penalty.
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    claudicici

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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by claudicici on Wed May 19, 2010 12:07 am

    ...exactly...
    ...and the 16 year old daughter was sentenced to 5 years because she did not report it?

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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by Guest on Wed May 19, 2010 8:58 am

    "To your last point: There's probably more than one reason why a state would make killing a police officer a capital crime, when other murders are not so treated. I've never heard the one you state, about their relative value.... However, one justification I have run into is that it's considered to be an additional deterrent to killing, in a situation where killing is so likely to happen. That is, police find themselves facing criminals with guns more than most of us find ourselves in such situations. Therefore, to add some "teeth" to the threat of a murder charge, the law imposes capital murder in that particular case."
    I don't personally believe that the death penalty is a deterrant to crime. It is a frequent argument used to support the states need to kill but practically speaking I don't think it works that way. I think that in most cases a murderer either 1] does not rationally consider the consequences of their actions or 2] thinks that they will not be caught. I do not think that any murderer would decide to proceed becuase they believed they are only gettting a life sentence but would decide to stop if they thought they may face death.
    Ask any convict serving a life sentence if they think they got away with something.

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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by Guest on Wed May 19, 2010 6:29 pm


    Va. governor denies clemency for condemned killer

    May 15, 2010 - 11:02am


    FILE - In this undated file photo provided by the Virginia Dept. of Corrections, death-row inmate Darick Walker is shown. Gov. Bob McDonnell denied clemency Saturday, May 15, 2010 for Walker, who was convicted in two separate shooting deaths, leaving the U.S. Supreme Court as his only hope to stop his execution. McDonnell said he found no compelling reason to stop Thursday's scheduled execution of Darick Demorris Walker, 37. (AP Photo/Virginia Dept. of Corrections, File)



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    By DENA POTTER
    Associated Press Writer
    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - Gov. Bob McDonnell denied clemency Saturday for a Virginia man convicted in two separate shooting deaths, leaving the U.S. Supreme Court as his only hope to stop his execution.
    McDonnell said he found no compelling reason to stop Thursday's scheduled execution of Darick Demorris Walker, 37.
    Walker was convicted of killing Stanley Beale in 1996 and Clarence Elwood Threat in 1997. Virginia law allows the death penalty for anyone who commits two premeditated murders within three years.
    Walker's attorneys have said his mental capabilities do not meet the constitutional threshold for execution. They also argued that prosecutors withheld evidence that cast doubt on the eyewitness testimony of one of the victims' daughter.
    McDonnell said he reviewed Walker's case and his request for clemency, but that he declined to intervene.
    "I find no compelling reason to set aside the sentence that was rendered by the jury and imposed and affirmed by the courts," McDonnell said.
    Walker has two appeals before the U.S. Supreme Court, which likely will decide early next week whether to block his execution.
    Witnesses testified that Walker broke into Beale's apartment on Nov. 22, 1996, pointed a gun at him and asked why he kept coming to Walker's home looking for him. Beale said he didn't know Walker, and Walker shot him three times as Beale's 13-year-old daughter looked on.
    In the other shooting, the victim's girlfriend said she turned down a date invitation from Walker, who burst into her home on June 18, 1997, and shot Threat seven times.
    Walker has claimed that the prosecution failed to disclose police reports casting doubt on the eyewitness testimony of Beale's daughter. In a separate appeal, he also claimed that he was mentally disabled, which would make him ineligible for the death penalty.
    The courts have rejected both those claims before.
    Walker's attorney did not immediately return a message seeking comment.
    McDonnell said after taking office in January that he would make clemency decisions no later than five days before a scheduled execution. In the past, governors had waited until after all legal remedies were exhausted before deciding whether to intervene.
    Walker's would be second execution in McDonnell's term. Virginia executes more prisoners than any state besides Texas.
    (Copyright 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)
    By DENA POTTER
    Associated Press Writer
    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) - Gov. Bob McDonnell denied clemency Saturday for a Virginia man convicted in two separate shooting deaths, leaving the U.S. Supreme Court as his only hope to stop his execution.
    McDonnell said he found no compelling reason to stop Thursday's scheduled execution of Darick Demorris Walker, 37.
    Walker was convicted of killing Stanley Beale in 1996 and Clarence Elwood Threat in 1997. Virginia law allows the death penalty for anyone who commits two premeditated murders within three years.
    Walker's attorneys have said his mental capabilities do not meet the constitutional threshold for execution. They also argued that prosecutors withheld evidence that cast doubt on the eyewitness testimony of one of the victims' daughter.
    McDonnell said he reviewed Walker's case and his request for clemency, but that he declined to intervene.
    "I find no compelling reason to set aside the sentence that was rendered by the jury and imposed and affirmed by the courts," McDonnell said.
    Walker has two appeals before the U.S. Supreme Court, which likely will decide early next week whether to block his execution.
    Witnesses testified that Walker broke into Beale's apartment on Nov. 22, 1996, pointed a gun at him and asked why he kept coming to Walker's home looking for him. Beale said he didn't know Walker, and Walker shot him three times as Beale's 13-year-old daughter looked on.
    In the other shooting, the victim's girlfriend said she turned down a date invitation from Walker, who burst into her home on June 18, 1997, and shot Threat seven times.
    Walker has claimed that the prosecution failed to disclose police reports casting doubt on the eyewitness testimony of Beale's daughter. In a separate appeal, he also claimed that he was mentally disabled, which would make him ineligible for the death penalty.
    The courts have rejected both those claims before.
    Walker's attorney did not immediately return a message seeking comment.
    McDonnell said after taking office in January that he would make clemency decisions no later than five days before a scheduled execution. In the past, governors had waited until after all legal remedies were exhausted before deciding whether to intervene.
    Walker's would be second execution in McDonnell's term. Virginia executes more prisoners than any state besides Texas.

    (Copyright 2010 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by Guest on Wed May 19, 2010 6:31 pm

    VA court appeals are over, the US court is unlikely to hear the case, and Governor McDonald has issued a statement indicating that he will not intervene. Darick Walker will be executed in VA tomorrow.
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    claudicici

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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by claudicici on Wed May 19, 2010 9:06 pm

    do you know if there are any protests at all going on?

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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by Guest on Thu May 20, 2010 8:52 am

    claudicici wrote:do you know if there are any protests at all going on?
    There is usually a small and non disruptive vigle / protest outside the prison but I don't think there is much else. VA loves its death penalty. In my experience most people I talk to here seem to support captial punishment.

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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by Guest on Thu May 20, 2010 7:02 pm

    Man who killed 2 scheduled for execution tonight


    Posted to: Crime News Virginia




    myvid = "187904";
    mypath = "/simpleview";




    Darick Demorris Walker was convicted of killing Stanley Beale in 1996 and Clarence Elwood Threat in 1997.

    Database:
    Executions in Virginia since 1982











    The Associated Press
    ©️ May 20, 2010

    By Dena Potter
    RICHMOND
    A condemned Virginia inmate is awaiting word from the U.S. Supreme Court as to whether his execution will go forward.
    The court is the last hope for 37-year-old Darick Demorris Walker, who is set to die by injection at 9 tonight at Greensville Correctional Center in Jarratt.
    Gov. Bob McDonnell has refused to block the execution. Walker has two appeals pending before the court.
    Walker was convicted of killing Stanley Beale in 1996 and Clarence Elwood Threat in 1997. Virginia law allows the death penalty for anyone who commits two premeditated murders within three years.
    Walker's attorneys claim that he is mentally unfit for capital punishment and that prosecutors withheld evidence casting doubt on eyewitness testimony at his trial.






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    I will NEVER....

    Submitted by jaimej98880 on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 6:48 pm.

    believe in Captial Punishment till the day I die...and guess what...my nephew murdered my sister (his mother) and I don't think he should die for what he did....I think he should sit in jail for the rest of his life and think about what he did to his mother (the woman who game him LIFE...BUT guess what...he got 30 years for "voluntary manslaughter"...Why isn't murder..MURDER????
    On "good behavior" he can get out in 15 years.
    Can you believe that he got that little bit of time for stabbing your own mother 11 times with a japanies samari sword....????????

    0 or 0




    spelling correction...

    Submitted by jaimej98880 on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 6:50 pm.

    *gave him life* and *japanese samauri sword*

    0 or 0





    I AM a Christian!

    Submitted by ashleym90912 on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 5:19 pm.

    We DO have the right to sentence to death if the crime fits..
    Romans 13:1-4 Every person should obey the government. No government would exist if it hadn't been established by God. The governments which exist have been put in place by God. Therefore whoever resists the government opposes what God has established. Those who resist will bring punishment on themselves. People who do what is right don't have to be afraid of the government. But people who do what is wrong should be afraid of it. The goverment is God's servant working for your good. But if you do what if wrong, you should be afraid. The government has the right to carry out the death sentence. It is God's servant, an avenger to execute God's anger on anyone who does what it wrong. God's Word Translation

    0 or 1




    Death Sentence

    Submitted by Wally Erb on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 6:34 pm.

    Some how I fail to see death sentence stated in your version/site. Executing wrath is not interpreted in executing a life.

    0 or 0




    ashelym wrote "The

    Submitted by benoit on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 6:13 pm.

    ashelym wrote "The governments which exist have been put in place by God. Therefore whoever resists the government opposes what God has established."
    Interesting opinion, but what, if anything, does the Bible have to do with the U.S. Constitution and our system of laws?

    0 or 0





    Forgive and Forget!

    Submitted by joannek23456 on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 4:44 pm.

    I'm sure we will all be willing to forgive and forget murderers - as soon as they are gone from this earth. Then God can decide if he "forgives" them and if He does, then He can deal with them. I prefer to forget them. Sorry, guys, but you can quote the bible all day long and it will not change my opinion. The one exception I have is when a person is convicted on circumstantial evidence. I want to see hard and fast evidence before I can agree to the death penalty.

    1 or 0




    Forgiveness

    Submitted by Wally Erb on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 4:16 pm.

    Although it is normal for us to feel anger toward sin and injustice, it is not our job to judge the other person in their sin.
    Luke 6:37
    Do not judge, and you will not be judged. Do not condemn, and you will not be condemned. Forgive, and you will be forgiven.

    Why must we forgive?
    The best reason to forgive is because Jesus commanded us to forgive. We learn from Scripture, if we don't forgive, neither will we be forgiven:
    Matthew 6:14-16
    For if you forgive men when they sin against you, your heavenly Father will also forgive you. But if you do not forgive men their sins, your Father will not forgive your sins.

    We forgive out of obedience to the Lord. It is a choice, a decision we make. However, as we do this "forgiving," we discover the command is in place for our own good, and we receive the reward of our forgiveness - freedom.

    0 or 3




    By that logic, we shouldnt

    Submitted by Lores on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 4:28 pm.

    By that logic, we shouldnt punish either.

    0 or 0




    Logic?

    Submitted by Wally Erb on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 4:36 pm.

    This is about faith, not logic

    0 or 1





    Life

    Submitted by Wally Erb on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 4:27 pm.

    Life without parole is a justified alternative that provides for possible repentance and frees us from wages of a mortal sin. For whether we condone or disagree with capital punishment, the sin of execution falls upon all of us.

    1 or 3




    Amazing post!

    Submitted by Archie on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 4:29 pm.

    Simply amazing . . .

    0 or 0





    First, there is no god

    Submitted by Archie on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 4:25 pm.

    Second, the Commonwealth does not forgive; it adjusts. Adjusting him from life to death will make our lives better. Shame it took so long.

    1 or 0




    Why do you feel the need to

    Submitted by Lores on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 4:29 pm.

    Why do you feel the need to say that rather than insert an aurgument?

    0 or 0






    Just one more example of backwards

    Submitted by AyeAyeCapn on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 3:41 pm.

    A government performed, premeditated execution is just one more example of the mindset and behavior that keeps Virginia high in the rankings of 3rd world, backward states. It's strange how people think systematic killing is "justice." Don't misunderstand, I have no mercy for the perpetrators of heinous crimes, but government lackeys killing people with malice (strongly represented in the comments here) and premeditation is the same offense as the perpetrator's. It merely government sanctioned.

    2 or 3




    And the other crime ....

    Submitted by ssdamore752 on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 11:12 am.

    With this is that the tax payers have been having to support this individual for all these yrs.

    1 or 0




    It's interesting

    Submitted by Reedo3000 on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 1:25 pm.

    It actually costs more for a death row inmate, than an inmate sentenced to life without the possibility of parole. Last time I looked it was a difference of nearly 100K. So it would actually cost tax payers much less if he was simply sentenced to life w/o parole.

    0 or 0




    It would cost less to

    Submitted by swami on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 4:07 pm.

    It would cost less to release him but that is not the just thing to do.

    0 or 0






    It makes no sense to murder

    Submitted by soulrebel on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 11:04 am.

    It makes no sense to murder someone who murdered someone else, in order to show that murder is wrong. Besides, it doesn't exactly deter anyone from murdering anyways.

    1 or 3




    Ah, but it does!

    Submitted by Archie on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 4:18 pm.

    The person executed will never kill again.
    I do wish we could keep costs down, perhaps speeding up the appeals process, say, to under a year after initial conviction. Some people deserve to be dead, and this creature is one such.

    0 or 0




    As noted earlier

    Submitted by gknutson on Thu, 05/20/2010 at 12:30 pm.

    This is not murder, it is simply euthanizing a rabid animal. Humans do not murder humans, animals do.


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    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by Guest on Thu May 20, 2010 7:06 pm

    The comments are my favorite part of the articles. The one referring to Romans 13:1-4 is a classic. I wonder if the author has the same view of the government of North Korea?

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    Guest

    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by Guest on Thu May 20, 2010 7:10 pm

    At the risk of being offensive, people who quote several thousand year old historical texts that were pieced together from a variety of sources written in languages that no one speaks anymore, then translated, and selectively edited and beleive that it is a divine mandate as to how we should resolve problems now make me tired.

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    Guest

    Re: VA death row inmates

    Post by Guest on Thu May 20, 2010 10:14 pm

    Va. man who killed two is executed


    Posted to: Crime News Virginia




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    Darick Demorris Walker was convicted of killing Stanley Beale in 1996 and Clarence Elwood Threat in 1997.

    Database:
    Executions in Virginia since 1982










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    The Associated Press
    ©️ May 20, 2010

    By Dena Potter
    JARRATT
    A Virginia inmate who killed two Richmond men in separate shootings has been executed.
    Darick Demorris Walker, 37, died by lethal injection at 9:24 p.m. Thursday at Greensville Correctional Center in Jarratt.
    Walker was convicted of killing Stanley Beale in 1996 and Clarence Elwood Threat in 1997. Virginia law allows the death penalty for anyone who commits two premeditated murders within three years.
    The U.S. Supreme Court refused to block Walker's execution Thursday, days after Gov. Bob McDonnell said he found no compelling reason to commute the sentence to life. Justices John Paul Stevens, Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor would have granted the stay.
    Walker was the 107th inmate put to death in Virginia since the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated capital punishment in 1976. Only Texas has executed more prisoners.
    Witnesses testified that Walker kicked in the door to the apartment where Beale lived with his three children and their mother on Nov. 22, 1996, pointed a gun at him and asked why Beale kept coming to his house looking for him. Beale told Walker he didn't know him and Walker shot him three times.
    In the other shooting on June 18, 1997, Threat and his girlfriend, Andrea Noble, were sleeping in their bedroom when Walker kicked open the door and shot Threat seven times as Noble's children screamed and cried in their bedrooms.
    In each case, the victims knew Walker by a different name.
    Beale's 13-year-old daughter, Bianca Taylor, testified that she knew Walker from their Richmond neighborhood as "Todd." She said she saw him bust in and shoot her father before her mother ushered her into a bathroom to hide.
    Noble told police she knew Walker as "Paul," and that she recently had turned down a date invitation from him. At trial, another woman testified that Walker robbed her, but she knew him as "Ty."
    Reached by phone, Noble refused to comment. Working numbers for Beale's family could not be located.
    None of the victims' family members planned to witness the execution, said Larry Traylor, spokesman for the Department of Corrections.
    Walker met with members of his immediate family Thursday, Traylor said. They are not allowed to witness the execution.
    In one of Walker's appeals, his attorneys claimed the prosecution failed to disclose police reports suggesting Beale's daughter only heard the voice of the man she knew as Todd, but did not see his face.
    In the other, Walker's attorneys claimed he is too mentally impaired to be executed.
    Walker had trouble dressing and feeding himself as a boy and spent most of his education in remedial classes. Unable to read or perform beyond an elementary school level, Walker quit school after the eighth grade.
    As an adult, Walker was unable to manage his finances, keep a job or live independently. At age 33, he functioned at the level of an 11-year-old, his attorneys claimed.
    They pointed to multiple IQ tests taken throughout Walker's life in which he falls within the range of mental disability that precludes execution.
    Prosecutors agreed that Walker has "below average mental intelligence" but said his ability to have sexual relationships, perform simple tasks and obtain goods in prison demonstrated that he has no significant limitations in adaptive behavior, another measure in determining whether someone is suitable for execution.

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